Ask us a question

Please fill in our form and one of our experts will get back to you. Alternatively, call our 24 hour number on:  0113 245 8549

Name is required
Please enter your email address
Please enter your telephone number
Please enter the best time for us to call you
Please enter the details of your enquiry
Please let us know how you heard about us
Please enter the verification code
  • Our clients
  • Our team
  • Your future

Loss of teeth following untreated gum disease

V suffered tooth loss as a result of a delay in the diagnosis of her gum disease. V visited her dentist three or four times a year for a standard examination, and a scale and polish.

She was at no point made aware of having periodontal problems and by the time she was referred to a periodontist, her gum disease was so far advanced she needed several teeth immediately removing. She also had advanced bone loss.

Our approach

We sought independent advice and our expert confirmed that there was a failure to detect the gum disease and that if V’s dentist had done so, she would not have lost her teeth. 

The outcome

The claim was initially defended, and a compensation offer of £20,000 was made to our client. We advised her to reject this amount. Following negotiation another offer of £45,000 was made, which V accepted.

The case in detail

V's claim related to dental treatment she received from her dentist for over a decade. She used to attend him three to four times a year for scaling and polishing as well as an examination. She was not made aware of any underlying periodontal problems nor was she advised to seek input from a periodontal specialist. By the time that she was referred to a Periodontist she was diagnosed as having advanced periodontal disease and it was necessary for several of her teeth to be extracted. Advanced bone loss was also noted. The claim involved investigating the treatment and care which V received from her initial dentist.

Following our involvement, steps were taken to seek independent evidence. That expert found that there was a failure to detect and treat periodontal disease adequately with further evidence suggesting that had a prompt diagnosis been made then it would not have been necessary for V to have required extractions of her teeth. The claim was initially defended and an early offer of £20,000.00 was put forward and which was rejected. Further negotiations took place between the parties and eventually a compromise was reached with V accepting the sum of £45,000.00 in full and final settlement of her claim.